Adele Tickets Remain in High Demand For Her 2016 North American Headlining Tour

Adele at the SSE Hydro in Glasgow on March 26, 2016

Adele’s first North American tour in 5 years is scheduled to begin this summer on July 5 in St. Paul, Minnesota and run 56 dates through November. Adele will be out on the road in support of her most recent album 25. Tickets to see Adele are completely sold out on Ticketmaster, but they've been heating up on the secondary market.

As one of the most talked about tour announcements of 2016 so far, Adele ticket prices are rising steadily. According to the data found on TiqIQ, the average ticket currently stands at $848.

Adele will make stops at venues across the USA including six dates at both The Staples Center in Los Angeles and Madison Square Garden in New York City. Average ticket prices for The Staples Center are currently averaging $868, with some of the cheaper tickets coming in at $205 on August 9 and $209 on August 12. Adele’s dates at Madison Square Garden are currently averaging $1,066, with the lowest get in price on September 20 and September 25, both at $314. Parking for New York City can be found ahead of time and secured easily through ParkWhiz.com.

Adele’s final stop in the United States will be on November 9 at the Toyota Center in Houston, Texas, where tickets are averaging, $984 and the cheapest are currently going for $359.

Two other highly anticipated tours in 2016 will be Coldplay’s A Head Full of Dreams Tour, and Beyonce’s Formation World Tour. Tickets to see Coldplay are currently averaging $288, and Tickets for Beyonce are averaging $247.

Adele’s ticket prices on the resale marketplace are much higher than Coldplay and Beyonce in part because she is playing arena venues which are significantly smaller than the stadiums where the other megastar acts are scheduled to perform. Beyonce is expected to make more money on the road than any other female artist in 2016, even though she is playing less concerts than Adele.

Adele, Coldplay and Beyonce tickets will remain in high demand across the secondary market as their kick off dates approach, and all three are still on their way to becoming the most talked about tours of 2016.
 
 
This post is sponsored by TiqIQ

  • incognitouser

    It should not be legal to buy tickets for the sole purpose of selling them at outrageous prices. All this does is deny people who could afford face value prices from attending. If a ticket is resold it should be sold at face value only.There should be no fees of any kind attached in order to make a profit.